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Art installation heads to Balmoral to celebrate salmon conservation


By Lewis McBlane

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A SALMON sculpture which represents climate change will become the first contemporary art exhibited at Balmoral Castle.

Salmon School will go on show at Balmoral
Salmon School will go on show at Balmoral

The artwork by artist Joseph Rossano is called The Salmon School, and is made up from 250 mirrored fish hung from the ceiling.

Artist Joseph Rossano said, “The Salmon School is an international collaborative performance project that contextualises the finality of a seemingly infinite resource.

"A synthesis of art and science, The Salmon School fosters environmental awareness, bringing together diverse communities for a greater good — cold, clean water.

"Embracing art’s ability to disarm, to make something beautiful — a sculpture mimicking an ideal, a restored ecosystem — the project achieves measurable change through its actions and initiatives.”

The piece, which was first displayed in the UK as part of the COP26 summit in Glasgow, will be a key part of the Life at Balmoral exhibition.

The sculpture’s display coincides with a project, supported by The River Dee Trust, The Missing Salmon Alliance and Atlantic Salmon Federation, aiming to use DNA to ease pressures on salmon populations.

Over the coming months, Deeside children will also be taking part in scientific research as part of the Salmon School project, using environmental DNA from water samples to gain insights into the river’s life.

Made from recyclable glass – an endlessly recyclable material – Salmon School reminds us that art need not wastefully consume resources.

The sculpture’s supporting structure, created in partnership with The Balmoral Estate, Eckersley O’Callaghan, and Rossano Studios, is itself recycled, made from wind-felled Balmoral scots pine.

The Salmon School will take centre stage at Balmoral Castle from April 1 to August 2.


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