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Cold Weather Payments offer cash boost when temperatures drop


By Alan Beresford

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PEOPLE claiming a range of benefits could be in line for extra payments to help with heating costs.

UK Government Minister for Scotland Iain Stewart.
UK Government Minister for Scotland Iain Stewart.

Cold Weather Payments, totalling £25 a week, are triggered when the average temperature reaches, or is forecast to be, below freezing over seven consecutive days at the weather station linked to your area, between November 1 and March 31. Last year almost £100 million was paid out in total to individuals and families who needed it.

If you receive Pension Credit, Income Support, income-based Jobseeker’s Allowance, Employment and Support Allowance, Universal Credit or Support for Mortgage Interest then you may be eligible.

You can check here https://www.gov.uk/cold-weather-payment/eligibility

UK Government Minister for Scotland Iain Stewart said: “As we head towards winter, it’s really important that people across Scotland know about the UK government support available to help keep their homes warm.

“Cold Weather Payments provide help to those who need it most. They're paid automatically and people can check online if their local area is due funds.”

If you are eligible, you do not need to take any action as you will be paid automatically.

Those who have not received your payment but are eligible should tell their pension centre or Jobcentre Plus office. If you are getting Universal Credit, sign in to your account and add a note to your journal.

Cold Weather Payments do not affect your other benefits.

More information can be found here https://www.gov.uk/cold-weather-payment/how-to-claim


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